Fr. René Butler MS - 5th Sunday of Easter -...
Fruit of Vine or Tree (5th Sunday of Easter: Acts 9:26-31; 1 John 3:18-24; John 15:1-8) Jesus, drawing on a sight familiar to anyone in his day, describes himself as a vine and his disciples as branches in the Father’s vineyard. For us, he might have used a... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 4th Sunday of Easter - The...
The Lord is my... (4th Sunday of Easter: Acts 4:8-12; 1 John 3:1-2; John 10:11-18) Most of us, if asked to finish the above title phrase, would say: Shepherd. We might even be surprised that today, often called “Good Shepherd Sunday,” we do not have the... Czytaj więcej
Letter - Easter 2021
Holy Easter 2021 “Christ died for our sins, he was buried and he was raised on the accordance with the scriptures” (1Cor 15,3-4) “If they are converted....” (Our Lady of La Salette) Dear brothers, like last year, this year again Easter... Czytaj więcej
The invitation – anamnesis
The invitation – anamnesis April 2021 The Eucharist – Source and Summit of History The same words of the introduction – “Come closer, my children” and “I am here to tell you great news” – are on the part of the... Czytaj więcej
prev
next

Sanctuaries most visited

Items filtered by date: January 2021

Remember and Return

(1st Sunday of Lent: Genesis 9:8-15; 1 Peter 3:18-22; Mark 1:12-15)

God’s covenant with Noah was accompanied by a sign, the rainbow. Its stated purpose is to keep God from forgetting his promise, “There shall not be another flood to devastate the earth.”

Ordinary signs point us in the direction of something ahead of us. The rainbow, and other signs of other covenants, do the opposite. They tell us to look back, to remember what God has done for his people, and especially why.

La Salette is about conversion, repentance, and reconciliation. Those whom the Beautiful Lady calls “my people” had forgotten their covenant relationship with her Son, who had called on the people of his day to repent and believe in the Gospel. Her message is similar: remember, and return.

It is not surprising that she spoke in particular about Sunday Mass. “For on this day Christ's faithful are bound to come together into one place so that; by hearing the word of God and taking part in the eucharist, they may call to mind the passion, the resurrection and the glorification of the Lord Jesus, and may thank God.” (Vatican II on the Liturgy, 106)

In every celebration of the Eucharist we hear Jesus’ words, “Do this in memory of me.” In today’s Psalm we pray, “In your kindness remember me.” This is not only a matter of looking back. As with all covenant signs, the purpose is to let the Lord renew his presence and action in us, so that we can move forward with new strength and courage.

Lent is an opportunity to recognize to what extent we have strayed from our first fervor, so that we can return to a faithful covenant relationship going forward. This is the “clear conscience” of which St. Peter writes in the second reading.

Both the rainbow and La Salette (especially Mary’s crucifix) serve as reminders of God’s fidelity. Both are miracles of light and hope. God will never again destroy all mortal beings with a flood, and Mary, if we heed her words, will never again weep at the prospect of letting fall the arm of her Son.

If during these forty days we can remember and return, maybe we can show others the way back, too.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)

Moved with Pity

(6th Ordinary Sunday: Leviticus 13:1-2,44-46; 1 Cor. 10:31—11:1; Mark 1:40-45)

St. Paul, in the second reading, describes his ministry as “not seeking my own benefit but that of the many, that they may be saved.”

This is exactly the example given by Jesus in the Gospel. He healed a leper, but not to attract attention to himself. Otherwise, why would he ask the man not to tell anyone, and why would Mark mention the inconvenience caused to Jesus when his fame began to spread?

Jesus acted because he was moved with pity. Before him knelt a man who was not only sick, but who was obliged by the Law of God to self-isolate, to practice social distancing, and to cover his mouth.

Moved with pity, the Mother of Jesus came in tears to La Salette. She asked nothing for herself. She was concerned about others: her people and her Son.

We might ask ourselves, “When is the last time I felt pity?” No doubt we will find many examples, among family and friends, or from the news reports of disasters and tragedies of all kinds. There are forms of marginalization directed at others because of social, religious and even political differences. Opportunities for experiencing pity abound.

The next question is harder. “Moved with pity, how did I act?” Perhaps the question seems unfair. After all, Jesus and Mary were able to intervene in a supernatural way.

La Salette priests are in a position, of course, to administer the Sacrament of Reconciliation. They do so gladly, and La Salette Shrines specialize, so to speak, in making confessors readily available.

For sin is a disease underlying so much of the evil in today’s world. Today’s Psalm offers great hope: “I acknowledged my sin to you, my guilt I covered not... and you took away the guilt of my sin.”

Priest or not, all of us can do something. Most of us will spontaneously respond to console someone we know who has suffered a great loss. Dedicated to the cause of reconciliation, we are determined never to be the cause of alienation to another person.

Jesus showed no hesitation before the leper’s plea. “I do will it.” Like Jesus, like Mary, let’s do what we can.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)

Right and Just

(5th Ordinary Sunday: Job 7:1-7; 1 Corinthians 9:16-23; Mark 1:29-39)

In the Preface, which introduces the Eucharistic Prayer at Mass, we affirm that it is “right and just, always and everywhere,” to praise the Lord our God for the blessings being recalled in that day’s liturgy.

Always. Everywhere. This seems to suppose a life of constant celebration. But Job, a true man of God, states, “I shall not see happiness again.” That he found himself in such a state is sad, but it is important for us to know—and accept—that believers can have bad days, weeks, months, even years.

You may recall that Job’s situation was the result of a wager. God praised Job’s righteousness, but Satan answered, “Put forth your hand and touch anything that he has, and surely he will blaspheme you to your face.” So God allowed Satan to torment Job. And although Job complained loud and long of his sufferings, we read, “In all this Job did not sin, nor did he say anything disrespectful of God.”

In many parts of France in 1846, the people were facing severe hardships. They responded by using Jesus’ name, not with prayerful respect, which is right and just, but in the expression of their anger, as Mary pointed out at La Salette.

Like Job, there are times when we have lots more questions than answers, regarding our own troubles or those of others. It is especially troubling to see Christians, struggling with fear, doubt, stress, etc., sometimes abandoning the faith, turning away from God at the time when they need him most. The Beautiful Lady’s call to conversion is addressed to just such persons.

St. Paul writes, “An obligation has been laid upon me.” He preached the Gospel out of love for Christ; out of love for others, he became “all things to all.”

Jesus also strove to bring his preaching and healing ministry, grounded in prayer, to as many as possible.

Mary tells us to make her message known. She has laid an obligation on us. In our own hard times, heads bowed low, if necessary, and humble as dust, it is right and just that we bear what we must for the sake of the Gospel and of our neighbor, in the hope of helping all to recognize Jesus’ healing presence.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)
Saturday, 16 January 2021 14:22

Unity in Prayer

INTERNATIONAL ROSARY

Unity in Prayer

“Do you pray well, my children?”…

“Ah! My children, you must do it well...”

The question and the request that the Beautiful Lady makes to Maximine and Melanie wants to remind all of us that a solid spirituality is one that is rooted in life and in the Word of God and begins with the practice of personal prayer. Prayer is a daily commitment in the life of the La Salette Laity.

We are living the Marian Year that prepares us for the celebration of the 175th anniversary of Our Lady's apparition at La Salette. Motivated by the joy of this time of preparation and enlightened by the request of the Beautiful Lady, the La Salette Laity of Italy and Argentina-Bolivia had the happy initiative to propose the realization of the International Rosary in other languages - which wants to be a moment of communion and sharing for all the La Salette Charismatic Family.

But how can the members of this Family come together if they are in such different places on the planet? The answer came in these times of pandemic. If it has forced us to social distancing and to cancel face-to-face activities, it has also brought us to look more closely at the possibilities that technology offers us such as applications for meetings and meetings “online” via computer or cell phone.

The International Rosary is held through one of these applications always on the first Saturday of the month. The members of the Laity and the La Salette missionaries from 10 countries are participating and each month a country is invited to animate the meeting. The recitation of the prayers is divided among the countries being 6 languages: Spanish, French, Italian, English, Polish and Portuguese. Three intentions for which we always pray: the mission of Pope Francis, because in this way we unite with the whole Church; the overcoming of the Covid-19 pandemic that affects all countries and the care for the environment that is the Common Cause of all the La Salette Laity.

The question of the timetable also had to be thought after all the participants are in 8 different time zones. In Brazil, the Rosary takes place at noon, 9am in the United States, 11pm in the Philippines, in Europe at 4pm.

It is true that some problems can arise. The internet connection can fail or some difficulties with communication. But the spirit of prayer, fraternity and belonging to the La Salette Charismatic Family overcomes everything.

The Rosary is also transmitted by Facebook on the page Rosario Internazionale

Everyone is invited!

Published in LAY ASSOCIATES (EN)
Tuesday, 12 January 2021 19:18

Rosary - February 2021

Published in LAY ASSOCIATES (EN)
Tuesday, 12 January 2021 14:38

Bulletin - Salette Info 2020

Salette Info - Bulletin of the Congregation

Published in LAY ASSOCIATES (EN)

“I Know Who You Are!”

(4th Ordinary Sunday: Deuteronomy 18:15-20; 1 Corinthians 7:32-35; Mark 1:21-28)

In today’s Gospel, the people were astonished because Jesus “taught them as one having authority and not as the scribes.” One man in the synagogue, however, was not astonished but terrified. Possessed by an unclean spirit, he was the only one to recognize Jesus, and cried out, “I know who you are!” Jesus then did exactly what the demon feared most, and cast it out.

The unclean spirit knew him, while those who ought to have known him did not. At La Salette, the Beautiful Lady saw that her people, judging from their behavior, no longer knew her Son. To use the language of today’s Psalm 95, they had hardened their hearts and refused to hear his voice.

La Salette is therefore prophetic. While Mary’s appearance and manner are very different from how we usually imagine prophets, her message, like theirs, contains exhortations, promises and warnings.

God told Moses that he would raise up another prophet like him from among the people. “I will put my words into his mouth; he shall tell them all that I command him.” He kept this promise, over many generations.

In baptism, each of us was given a share in the dignity of Christ’s prophetic role. This responsibility may seem too much for us. So we pray, “Let your face shine on your servant. Save me in your merciful love. O Lord, let me never be put to shame, for I call on you” (Communion antiphon, Ps. 31).

The demon called Jesus “the Holy One of God,” and trembled. Christians call Jesus by that same title, and draw near. Psalm 95 puts this attitude into words. “Come, let us bow down in worship; let us kneel before the Lord who made us. For he is our God, and we are the people he shepherds, the flock he guides.”

Our worship and our faith-filled way of life are by nature prophetic, drawing attention to God’s presence and action in our world. In other words, it should be possible for those around us to say, “I know who you are—a follower of Jesus Christ.”

Some may even recognize a certain La Salette quality about us, and seek to understand what that is or, better still, how they may acquire it for themselves.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)

A New Song

(3rd Ordinary Sunday: Jonah 3:1-10; 1 Corinthians 7:29-31; Matthew 1:14-20)

We begin this reflection with today’s Entrance Antiphon: “O sing a new song to the Lord; Sing to the Lord, all the earth” (Ps. 96:1). It provides an insight into the readings and into La Salette.

In all the readings, there is momentous change. Nineveh responded to Jonah’s preaching. Jesus proclaims: “This is the time of fulfillment. The kingdom of God is at hand.” Four fishermen have abandoned their nets to follow him. St. Paul tells us, “The world in its present form is passing away.”

The La Salette Apparition was life-changing as well, not only for Mélanie and Maximin, but for many thousands of others, down to our own day and age.

The invitation to sing a new song applies not to the change itself, as if it were just a matter of novelty. It comes always in a context of joy and celebration. Something wonderful has happened—such as conversion or reconciliation—with intense new feelings seeking new expression.

There are many songs in many languages in honor of Our Lady of La Salette. But there is one that is intimately associated with the Shrine on the Holy Mountain in France. It makes no mention of the Apparition or the message. Rather, it is a poetic translation of the Angelus, set to music, and it is sung at the end of the candlelight procession every evening.

It is known as the La Salette Angelus, and regular pilgrims know it by heart. It is, in a way, their new song, renewing their love for the Beautiful Lady every time they sing it. Such a new song helps to drive out old negative habits and thoughts that often try to creep back into our lives.

Today’s Psalm contains an awesome prayer: “Your ways, O Lord, make known to me; teach me your paths. Guide me in your truth and teach me.” We need to have our feet planted on the firm ground of God’s guiding truth, which is never old.

The new song goes both ways. Consider this wonderful text from Zephaniah 3:17: “The Lord, your God, is in your midst, a mighty savior; he will rejoice over you with gladness, and renew you in his love, he will sing joyfully because of you, as one sings at festivals.”

Our new song is God’s, and his is ours!

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.


Published in MISSION (EN)
Sign in with Google+ Subscribe on YouTube Subscribe to RSS Upload to Flickr

Missionaries in USA

Login >>> ELENCHUS

Go to top