Fr. Rene Butler MS - Fifth Sunday of Easter -...
Ouch!(Fifth Sunday of Easter: Acts 9:26-31; 1 John 3:18-24; John 15:1-8)After Saul encountered Jesus on the road to Damascus, he remained blind, and had to be led by hand into the city. The Lord sent a certain Ananias to pray over him and restore his sight. Ananias... Czytaj więcej
The 32nd General Chapter
The 32nd General Chapter began its deliberations at Las Termas de Rio Hondo, Argentina Le 32ème Chapitre Général a Las Termas de Rio Hondo - Argentine. Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Fourth Sunday of Easter -...
Belonging(Fourth Sunday of Easter: Acts 4:8-12; 1 John 3:1-2; John 10:11-18)This is Good Shepherd Sunday. Each of the three years of the liturgical cycle has—on the fourth Sunday of Easter—we hear a different portion of John 10, where Jesus calls himself... Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Third Sunday of Easter -...
Facts of Life(Third Sunday of Easter: Acts 3:13-19; 1 John 2:1-5; Luke 24:35-48)St. Peter takes a conciliatory approach in addressing those who crucified Jesus: “You acted out of ignorance.” And he offers them the prospect of having their sins wiped... Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Easter - Witnesses
Witnesses(Easter: Acts 10:34-43; Colossians 3:1-4; John 20:1-9. Other options possible.)In the first reading, Peter states that he and his companions were witnesses to three distinct realities: 1) Jesus’ public ministry; 2) the risen Christ; and 3) that Jesus... Czytaj więcej
prev
next

Sanctuaries most visited

Fr. Rene Butler MS - Twenty-first Sunday - Wisdom, Submission, Tears

Wisdom, Submission, Tears
(Twenty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time: Isaiah 22:19-23; Romans 11:33-39; Matthew 16:13-10)
The readings are about authority. A certain Shebna is replaced by Eliakim as master of the palace; Simon is established as the rock foundation of the Church, with power to loose and bind; and God’s judgments require no advice from anyone.

From another perspective, however, they are less about authority than about God’s free choice. Why God chose Shebna or Simon is not stated, but God’s wisdom and knowledge are deep and rich, and he knows what he is doing and why. This can be difficult to grasp, especially in moments of public or private tragedy. ‘It’s God’s will’ is not always perceived as a satisfactory explanation. Even Job and Jeremiah seemed to expect God to justify his treatment of them.

It should not surprise us, then, that the farmers around La Salette railed at God when their crops were ruined. Theirs was a hard life at the best of times, and rules about Sunday rest and worship were for them just old wives’ tales, of interest only to the ‘few elderly women who go to Mass’—to use the Beautiful Lady’s words.
Mary feels no need to defend God. Quite the opposite, she calls us to submit. The submission she envisions is not mere passivity. It is an active recognition of who God is and who we are, of God’s all-encompassing knowledge and infinite wisdom.

This theme is not new with La Salette. Spiritual writers have long used the language of ‘abandonment’ and ‘surrender’ to God’s will. What stands out at La Salette is what happens when the People of God do not recognize his will, accept it and submit to it.
Natural disasters, for example, are exactly that: natural, though they are often called ‘acts of God.’ Not every catastrophe is a punishment. Still, the suffering and unhappiness that often surrounds us can make us wonder about our world and our place in it.

Mary provides a detailed list of troubles appropriate to the place where she appeared: crops of all kinds were failing, and young children were dying. If she were to appear in our country, what disasters and tragedies would bring tears to her eyes today?

Sign in with Google+ Subscribe on YouTube Subscribe to RSS Upload to Flickr

Missionaries in USA

Login >>> ELENCHUS

Go to top